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About The  Flag


Serving Lebanon is what we aimed at through "National Council for the Lebanese flag". 

Three factors characterize Lebanon: the charm of its nature, the mosaic of its diversified society with a long lasting experience of living in chorus, the large Diaspora and its willingness to adopt Lebanon’s mission and assume its role in the Arab world, building a peaceful civilization amongst the various communities that constitute Lebanon.

This is the Lebanon we are longing to build as an example of a pluralist society in our part of the world. Lebanon needs our loyalty. Our loyalty to its spirit, our loyalty to its mission, our loyalty to living in chorus amongst its plural society which represents its “raison d’être”
In the midst of an atmosphere tainted by all forms of uncertainty, we are more convinced than ever in making Lebanon’s mission a success. Hence the national council was created to spread the universal values amongst all citizens.

These motives and values are the basis on which the National Council for the Lebanese Flag was founded upon. It’s an honest and righteous Lebanese determination to carry this initiative to new heights by “building a new generation that cherishes Lebanon, believes in its plural society, yearns for its renaissance to be embedded in a civilized environment where justice and peace will always prevail”.

The program of the National Council for the Lebanese Flag is lead by Philip Honein, with its head-quarters located in Horch Tabet, Sin El Fil.

On February 25, 2013, the Council received its registration certificate from the Ministry of Interior under number 316. Thus, its legal framework has been completed and its moral character became apparent; it stands ready now to fulfill its responsibilities.

History & Specifications


Lebanese Flag

Our philosophy

Our approach

Our Message


Serving Lebanon is our duty and privilege at the "National Council for the Lebanese flag"

Three factors characterize Lebanon: the charm of its nature, the mosaic of its diversified society with a long lasting experience of living in chorus, the large Diaspora and its willingness to adopt Lebanon’s mission and assume its role in the Arab world, building a peaceful civilization amongst the various communities that constitute Lebanon.

This is the Lebanon we are longing to build as an example of a pluralist society in our part of the world. Lebanon needs our loyalty. Our loyalty to its spirit, our loyalty to its mission, our loyalty to living in chorus amongst its plural society which represents its “raison d’être”.

In the midst of an atmosphere tainted by all forms of uncertainty, we are more convinced than ever in making Lebanon’s mission a success. Hence the national council was created to spread the universal values amongst all citizens.

These motives and values are the basis on which the National Council for the Lebanese Flag was founded upon. It’s an honest and righteous Lebanese determination to carry this initiative to new heights by “building a new generation that cherishes Lebanon, believes in its plural society, yearns for its renaissance to be embedded in a civilized environment where justice and peace will always prevail”

The program of the National Council for the Lebanese Flag is lead by Philip Honein, with its head-quarters located in Horch Tabet, Sin El Fil.

On February 25, 2013, the Council received its registration certificate from the Ministry of Interior under number 316. Thus, its legal framework has been completed and its moral character became apparent; it stands ready now to fulfill its responsibilities.

Official Status


The Minister of Interior and Municipalities,

Pursuant to decree no 5818 of 06/13/2011 and its amendment no 5868 of 07/18/2011; Pursuant to the law of associations promulgated on August 03, 1909, especially article 6, according to circular no 10/2006 of 05/19/2006 and its amendment 15/2008 of 09/12/2008; Pursuant to the information submitted to the Ministry of Interior and Municipalities by the founders of the association named: “The National Council for the Lebanese Flag”, registered at the Common Administrative Directorate under no 19559 on 12/03/2012; Pursuant to the suggestion of the Director General of Political and Refugees Affairs by designate;

Decrees the following:

Article 1:

The Ministry of Interior and Municipalities was informed of the foundation of the association named: “The National Council for the Lebanese Flag”

Its head office: Sin El Fil - Pres. Charles Helou Street - near Hilton Hotel, National Council for the Lebanese Flag Building - 2nd floor.
Mobile: +961 3 682 500 | +961 71 302 576
Tel/Fax: +961 1 487 464

  • Its objectives: The association aims at the following:
  • Raise the Lebanese flag in various parts of the country as an emblem of remembrance and reconciliation.
  • Spread the sense of responsibility and awareness amongst our youth, encourage mutual respect and promote ethics, citizenship, civic education and human rights.
  • Shed light on the importance of the Lebanese civilization which offered the alphabet to the world from its birth place, the city of Byblos, and initiated law and legislation through the “Beirut law school” thus paving the way for the young generation to fulfill its mission on the path of humanism.
  • Make Lebanese citizens aware of their civic rights and duties as well of their environment
  • Create a national observatory to reject all forms of violence and extremism.
     
    The association's representative at the government:
    Mr. Philip Adel Honein

Story of the Lebanese Flag


Throughout history, Lebanon, or at least its region, had taken the flag of the people who occupied it (Phoenician, Mamluk, and Ottoman).
Here are some of the flags used throughout Lebanon's history:


Old Phoenician flag: This flag was blue, symbolizing the sea.


Phoenician flag: This flag was blue, symbolizing the sea, and red color (probably ‘purple’ intended) after color was discovered.


Mamluk flag: consisted of a cloth embroidered with golden threads.


Rebels Flag during Prince Ibrahim’s Era: It became a white cloth with a red carnation at the bottom right corner.


Rebels Flag: It consisted of a cross and a sword, both white, on a red cloth.


Shehabian Flag (1697-1842): Consisted of a blue cloth with a white crescent.


The Lamaïte Flag: It consisted of a white cloth with a drawing of a Lion.


Abi Nakad Flag: Consisted of two vertical and equal bands, one yellow and one blue.


National Maanites Flag: The Kaïssy Party Flag.


Maanites Flag at the end of the Maanites Emirate: End of the 17th Century


Ottoman Flag: consisted of a red cloth with a white crescent and white star in the center, and remained as such until their departure in 1918


Jumblatian Flag: It consisted of a red flag with a green frame; a sword and a dark green hand in the middle.


Lebanese Cedar: Following the fall of the Ottoman Empire, it consisted of a white cloth with a green cedar in the center.


Lebanese flag during the French Mandate (1920-1943): It was similar to the Blue, White and Red French Flag with a green Cedar in the middle, and was designed by the president of the Lebanese Renaissance Movement, the late Naoum Mukarzel.


In the 18th century the Maronites used a white flag with a cedar tree in the centre. It seems that in the First World War, Lebanese nationalists added the red stripes, representing firstly, the martyrs’ blood, and secondly, red and white were the colors of the Lebanese Legion, who, formed by the French in 1916, was the forerunner of the Lebanese Army.

When Lebanon was under a French mandate, the French tri-color was used with a cedar tree in the middle. There is a reference in Smith 1982 to the colors.


Lebanese Republic


The present Lebanese flag was adopted just prior to the independence from France in 1943.

Seeking for independence, the actual flag was first drawn by member of parliament Henri Pharaon in the Chamber of deputies, later taken to Saeb Salam’s house in Mousaitbeh by the deputies of the Lebanese parliament.

It was adopted on December 7, 1943, during a meeting in the parliament, where the article 5 in the Lebanese constitution was modified.

One theory is that since Henri Pharaon was a long-time consul in Vienna, Austria and was an avid friend and founder of the “Austro Lebanese Association of Friendship”, the colors could have been inspired by the red-white-red Flag of Austria.

The Austrian flag is the second oldest in the world, dating to the 13th century when it first probably appeared after the Siege of Acre during the Third Crusade.

Lebanese Flag: “The Lebanese flag is made of red, white and red horizontal stripes, with the cedar in green in the center of the white stripe”.


Lebanon

Official Name:

(Al-Jumhuriyyah al-Lubnaniyyah], Republic of Lebanon

Short Form:

[Lubnan], Lebanon

Capital:

Beirut

Location:

Middle East

Government Type:

Parliamentary Republic

Flag Adopted:

07 Dec 1943

Coat of Arms Adopted:

07 Dec 1943

Coat of arms of Lebanon

Flag Protocol


Flag code

The Lebanese flag should have a very distinctive protocol in accordance with patriotic customs, rituals and morality. It should be governed by a “Flag Code of Lebanon” along with the Emblems and Names. Official regulation should state that the flag must never touch the ground or be used as a drapery in any form.

On a mast or pole

The flag of honor which is the Lebanese flag, should be flown on the center mast. It is also correct to fly the flag on its own right. To an observer it would be on the far left. If more than three flags are used, the proper position is as far left from the point of view of an observer. An additional flag may be placed on the right side, but is not necessary. When two poles are crossed, the position of honor is the flag that ends on the left side from the point of view of an observer. In a semicircle, the position of honor is the center. If a full circle is used outside an entrance to an arena or stadium, the position of honor is directly over the entrance. If used to line the walls of the arena, the flag should be placed directly opposite the entrance.

Hanging

When flown horizontally, as from a flag pole, the flag should be oriented so that the cedar tree is in an upright position pointed upwards to the top of the pole. If hung against a wall, the cedar tree should be in an upright position from the point of view of the observer.When hung vertically, the flag should be rotated so the cedar tree is in an upright position pointing to the top of the pole. While the red stripes are horizontal.

Other places or for decorative or ceremonial reasons

On a vehicle the flag should be put on a window or affixed securely to the front of the chassis, on the nearside of the vehicle, i.e. the one opposite the driver. (In other words, in countries that drive on the right hand side of the road, the flag is on the right of the vehicle.) On a vehicle where a visiting Head of State or Government is sharing a car with the host Head of State or Government, the host’s flag takes the nearside position, the guest’s flag is on the offside. When placed with a podium or at a place of worship the flag should hang directly behind or on a pole to the right of the speaker, from the point of view of the flag. When carried in single file the flag of honor leads.

Multiple flags

When flags of many nations are flown the flag of the hosting country should be placed on the right with the rest following in alphabetical order in the language of the host country.

On a helicopter

During a ceremonial flypast, the flag should be flown from a weighted rope dangling from beneath a helicopter, in an upright position with the cedar tree pointing upwards.

National day of mourning

When the flag is displayed at half-staff, it should be raised briskly to the top of the flag pole, then lower it slowly to the half-way mark. This is also done when lowered the flag. The flag should be flown at half-staff until noon, and then raised to full staff for the remainder of the day. The flag should only be displayed at half-staff by a Presidential decree or by act of Cabinet – the exceptions should be stipulated, when the flag can be displayed at half-staff until sundown.

Our Vision


The National Council for the Lebanese Flag lays down a sound foundation to build upon a sound society, by addressing the importance of values and partake in raising responsible adults in their own communities. The Council also aims to create a sense of belonging, of citizenship and of belief in the future.




Our Mission


The association aims at the following:

Raise the Lebanese flag in various parts of the country as an emblem of remembrance, reconciliation and pride.

Spread the sense of responsibility and awareness amongst our youth, encourage mutual respect and promote ethics, citizenship, civic education and human rights.

Shed light on the importance of the Lebanese civilization which offered the alphabet to the world from its birth place “Byblos” and initiated law and legislation through the “Beirut Law School” thus paving the way for the young generation to fulfill its mission on the path of humanism.

Create awareness among Lebanese citizens on their civic rights, duties and their values.

Create a national observatory to reject all forms of violence and extremism.

Help build the character of the youth through six pillars; trustworthiness; respect; responsibility; fairness; caring and citizenship.

Empower our youth through understanding the principles of accountability, and the value of self worth.




The Six Pillars Of Character Building


Trustworthiness

Be honest • Don’t deceive, cheat, or steal • Be reliable - do what you say you’ll do • Have the courage to do the right thing • Build a good reputation • Be loyal - stand by your family, friends, and country.

Respect

Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule • Be tolerant and accepting of differences • Use good manners, not bad language • Be considerate of the feelings of others • Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone • Deal peacefully with anger, insults, and disagreements

Responsibility

Do what you are supposed to do • Plan ahead • Persevere: keep on trying! • Always do your best • Use self-control • Be self-disciplined • Think before you act — consider the consequences • Be accountable for your words, actions, and attitudes • Set a good example for others

Fairness

Play by the rules • Take turns and share • Be open-minded; listen to others • Don’t take advantage of others • Don’t blame others carelessly • Treat all people fairly

Caring

Be kind • Be compassionate and show you care • Express gratitude • Forgive others • Help people in need

Citizenship

Do your share to make your school and community better • Cooperate • Get involved in community affairs • Stay informed; vote • Be a good neighbor • Obey laws and rules • Respect authority • Protect the environment • Volunteer

Events & Activities


The visit led by the administrative body of the National Council for the Lebanese Flag to inform the President of the Republic of Lebanon Michel Sleiman about the program of the Council.

His Excellency Husein El-Huseini, Former speaker of the Parliament visiting the National Council for the Lebanese Flag headquarters in Sin El-Fil, where he was briefed on the Council’s mission and programs.

The Lebanese Flag elevated at the memorial resting place of the first President of Lebanon, Sheikh Bechara El-Khoury, presented by the National Council for the Lebanese Flag.

Council’s representative Mr. Adel Honein attending the memorial ceremony of Sheikh Bechara El- Khoury, the first President of the Republic of Lebanon.

Council’s representatives visiting the university to celebrate the national Flag Day. Shown in the side photo a student holding a drawing of the Lebanese flag with the following writing: “to Knowledge, to the Flag, to Preserve our Nation”..

Contact Us


Where we are


  • Philip A. Honein
    President - Founder
  • Lebanon, Sin El Fil, Horch Tabet,
    Charles Helou Avenue
    National Council for the Lebanese Flag bldg, 2nd floor
  • + (961) 1   487 464
  • + (961) 3   682 500
  • + (961) 71 302 576
  • : info@ncflf.org